COVID vs. Caffeine: How Coronavirus Is Changing the Way Americans Get Their Coffee

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As companies begin to reopen amidst a global pandemic, the coffee industry must quickly adapt to a new normal. Cafes that once housed long lines and packed seats now grapple with the realities (and requirements) of clean, contactless, and socially distanced service. Smaller coffee shops can only accommodate a few customers at a time, and even larger chains are struggling due to changing consumer behavior. Dunkin’ and Starbucks will close 450 and 300 stores this year, respectively. These powerhouse franchises assessed their locations’ capabilities to follow health mandates and deemed many shops unfit to operate safely.

Curbside pickup, mobile orders, and drive-thrus can suffice for now, but when people start returning to work, consumer demand for coffee will soon overrun coffee houses. In big cities—where waiting in line was already a part of many morning commutes—capacity limitations will rapidly become apparent. Coronavirus doesn’t seem to be going anywhere anytime soon, but neither is America’s need for coffee. How do we move forward?

GOffee’s unique approach to personalized coffee delivery provides a convenient, contactless option without sacrificing the quality and variety that a trip to the coffee shop once offered. With GOffee, your morning fuel can be satisfying and reliable. Navigating so much change these days can be complicated, but who said coffee had to be? 

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